Fascinating day yesterday with Marie Rundquist's presentation on DNA and several success stories from Deadra Doucet...

Posted by Acadian Memorial on Thursday, April 30, 2015
 
 
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Acadian Memorial Foundation, Inc.
P. O. Box 379 Dept. AMF  ~ 121 S. New Market Street 
St. Martinville, LA 70582 ~ (337) 394-2258
www.acadianmemorial.org


The Acadian Memorial Foundation is pleased to announce a Genealogy Day with author, genealogist and DNA specialist Marie A. Rundquist, of Washington, D.C., who will be with us on Wednesday, 29 April 2015 for two sessions at the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville.  See details below.   Seating is limited and reservations suggested for one session or both.   No reservation means seating on a "space available" basis for late arrivals. 

10 a.m. morning session: "How DNA Helps You with Your Genealogy" 

Presented by Marie Rundquist -  the DNA how-to's along with the success stories, covering a range of projects, that make the field exciting.

1:30 p.m. afternoon session: "Success Stories"

Presented by Marie Rundquist with Louisianians who have had  hands-on experience and success with DNA research. 

Click to download the flyer and sign up form here.
 
 
Picture
Acadian Memorial Foundation, Inc.
P. O. Box 379 Dept. AMF  ~ 121 S. New Market Street 
St. Martinville, LA 70582 ~ (337) 394-2258
www.acadianmemorial.org


The Acadian Memorial Foundation is pleased to announce a Genealogy Day with author, genealogist and DNA specialist Marie A. Rundquist, of Washington, D.C., who will be with us on Wednesday, 29 April 2015 for two sessions at the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville.  See details below.   Seating is limited and reservations suggested for one session or both.   No reservation means seating on a "space available" basis for late arrivals. 


10 a.m. morning session"How DNA Helps You with Your Genealogy" 

Presented by Marie Rundquist -  the DNA how-to's along with the success stories, covering a range of projects, that make the field exciting.

1:30 p.m. afternoon session: "Success Stories"

Presented by Marie Rundquist with Louisianians who have had  hands-on experience and success with DNA research. 

Click to download the flyer and sign up form here.
 
 
 Visit the Congrès mondial acadien 2014, Louisiana Day celebration, August 18th, 2014, in Grand Falls, New Brunswick, Canada!  Visit all of the activities and be present for the presentation of the long-awaited, Acadie, Then and Now : A People’s History (L’Acadie, hier et aujourd’hui : l’histoire d’un peuple (bilingue))Click here to view the flyer and click here to view the list of contributing authors. Click to view the current CMA launch schedule: Programme pour la Journée de la Louisiane

BOOK LAUNCH DATES & LOCATIONS:

  • Both English and French editions of the book will be launched at 1:30 pm on Monday, August 18 in Grand Falls, New Brunswick. The media event will be held on Louisiana Day at the EXPO-MONDE site. The address is: E & P Centre Senéchal, 60 Rue Ouellette, Grand Falls, N.B.
  • The following day, Tuesday, August 19, both editions of the book will be launched at 10:00 am at the Acadian Archives of the University of Maine. Address: 23 University Drive, Fort Kent, Maine. 
  • In Lafayette, Louisiana, the book launch will be at 11:00 am, on Sunday, September 28 at the Vermilionville Living History & Folklife Park, followed by music. Andrepont Publishing will distribute the book in the United States and worldwide through their partners. For more information, visit www.vermilionville.org.  The Bal du dimanche (Sunday dance) will start at 1:00 p.m.
  • In the U. S., the book may be ordered from Warren A. Perrin (perrin@plddo.com), Acadian Museum (www.acadianmuseum.com), or Andrepont Printing (www.andrepontprinting.com), and in Canada from La Grande Marée at jouellet@nbnet.nb.ca. On the web, the book will be available with Amazon.com and Barnesandnoble.com.
  • Acadians from around the world are showcased in a unique new book (in English and French) about the Acadian diaspora, which focuses on their communities in the United States, Canada and France.

*All profits of the book will be distributed to Acadian Museums in the United States and Canada.
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Authors at the Louisiana Day book launch: August 18, 2014, Grand Falls, New Brunswick
 
 

Announcing the David dit Saint Michel Family Tree DNA Project:

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The David dit Saint Michel Family Tree DNA Project is a genealogical and Y-DNA study that is open to all male descendants of Jean Pierre David dit Saint Michel and ancestors throughout Nouvelle France (New France) and the seat of the David dit Saint Michel family ..... France.

Jean Pierre David dit Saint Michel was a master blacksmith for the King of France, Louis XV, at the Fortress of Louisbourg from the early 1720's to the late 1750's. He was born between 1699 and 1700 in the Parish of Saint Nazaire, Diocese of Nantes, Lorie-Inférieure, Bretagne, France. Jean Pierre's family life story is so very much akin to the true life stories that are told over and over again of all French descendant and Acadian families that migrated from France to the new world in the 17th and 18th centuries. There, in Nouvelle France, they prospered, applied their trades and raised large families. Although they were a peace minded people, they would suffer great losses of life and property at the hands of the British Empire.  Click here to learn about the project...

 
 

The Story of don Juan de Onate and de la Cruz DNA: Genetic Genealogist breaks through Adobe Walls, ties Ancestry to New Mexico's First Families ... by Patricia Sanchez Rau with Marie Rundquist

PictureMaria Paula Garcia, Apolonio Quintana (1896)
The traditional story of “Early America” unfolds as Europeans arrive by ship at Plymouth Rock and Jamestown at the start of the seventeenth century.  The story continues, in countless textbooks, with the emergence of the thirteen English colonies followed by the American Revolution, and draws to a close as Lewis and Clark set off to explore lands west of the Mississippi in 1804.

The more recent, “American Story” is one of “Coming to America,” with crossings – of borders and oceans, and the first Federal Immigration Inspection Station: Ellis Island.

Patricia Sánchez Rau's American story departs wildly from traditional themes, for her family did not come to the United States as immigrants through Ellis Island or anywhere along the east coast. By contrast, Patricia's ancestors came from Spain, Portugal, Greece, North Africa, and other parts of Europe to Mexico. In 1598, years before the Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth Rock, they were among the New World's first pioneers who assembled on the banks of the San Pedro River under the dogged leadership of don Juan de Oñate, to embark upon their epic journey to New Mexico.  Click to read more...

 
 
PictureCourtesy, Richard Crumbacker
Dedicated July 28th, 2013, the "Acadians in Maryland" historic marker, installed and maintained by the State of Maryland, connects the dots for those whose Acadian ancestors lived in Maryland prior to their arrival in Louisiana. 

The marker is the first in the State of Maryland to recognize the little-known history of the Acadians who were sent to Maryland following their forced expulsion from Nova Scotia in 1755. 

For your heritage journey, to be complete, you MUST include a trip to Princess Anne, Maryland on Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore where you will  observe the Acadians in Maryland sign,  read the words, and recall the trials of Acadian ancestors.  On your visit to the Eastern Shore, plan to visit the Old White Marsh Church ruins off of Route 50, then take a walk along the waterfront  in Oxford, Maryland, and then wind your way down to Princess Anne, Maryland to observe the State's ONLY "Acadians in Maryland" historic marker.  Drive to the shores of the Wicomico River and imagine the Sloop Elizabeth sitting in its waters, her captain impatiently awaiting food and supplies that never came.   Follow the Beach to Bay Indian Trail to the Furnace Town Living Heritage Museum where the swamp lands and surrounding forests  hold the memories of ancestors who struggled to make their way through them.  Tour  Snow Hill, and you'll be able to capture an idea of what Acadian ancestors may have seen and experienced while living on the Delmarva Peninsula as they did for about a dozen years.

The words selected by the Maryland Historical Trust communicate the Acadian story with exceptional clarity. The dedication, which occurred on the Acadian Day of Remembrance, was a wonderful event, and attendance was excellent.

PictureCounty Commissioners Courtesy, Richard Crumbacker
The Louisiana Acadian Flag flew over Somerset County on the 30th of July, two days following the dedication of the Acadians in Maryland historic marker.  During the month of August, the flag will fly over the Manokin River Park and the Town of Princess Anne. 

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Louisiana Acadian Flag over Maryland. Courtesy, Brenda Benton
The Town plans to fly the Acadian Flag of Louisiana during the month of July in the years ahead in remembrance of the Acadians who lived in Maryland following their tragic deportation from Nova Scotia in 1755. Acadians and Marylanders each had a challenging part in a difficult time in history.  That the flying of the Louisiana Acadian flag will be an annual Princess Anne town tradition is stunning and mirrors the perpetuity of the marker. 

Photographs Courtesy Nancy Kurtz, Maryland Historical Trust

Additional Photos

 
 
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New Maryland Historical Trust Sign Unveiled Recognition Given to Acadian Heritage

Nearly 260 years ago a small group of refugees landed on the shores of Maryland against their will. The year was 1755, during the outset of the French and Indian War, but a different war was being waged against the French Catholics - known as Acadians - as they were expelled from their lands in Nova Scotia, Canada. Four shiploads, carrying about 900 Acadians, were unloaded on the shores of Maryland in November 1755 and by 1770 the majority of these displaced Acadians left by ship to Louisiana.

Rarely discussed in history books, these Acadian people were the early settlers of Oxford, Newtown (today Chestertown), Georgetown, Fredericktown, Baltimore, Annapolis, Upper Marlboro, Lower Marlboro and Port Tobacco and many of their names are found in the Maryland 1763 Acadian census.

At the Manokin River Park on July 28, 2013 at 3:00 pm, a Maryland Historical Trust Sign will be unveiled, recognizing the Acadians' contribution to Maryland's mainstream history and experience on the Eastern Shore.

Click here to read more...


 
 
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Nova Scotia's warming up! (Elsewhere too!)...and the festival season is beginning.  Here are some links to help you begin your travel-by-ancestry adventure!

http://canada.travelall.com/ns/eventcalendar.htm

and here's a not-to-be-missed festival:

http://www.festivalacadiendeclare.ca/en/

and don't forget to add this date to your calendar:

http://www.novascotia.com/en/home/thingstoseeanddo/listingdetails.aspx/mi%27kmaq-acadian-festval/-24764

Here's one from Newfoundland!

http://www.newfoundlandlabrador.com/planyourtrip/festivalsevents

and another location:

http://gowesternnewfoundland.com/activities/mikmaq-museumtte-du-cap-park/

Stay tuned for another historic event, as related to our ancestry, planned for July 28th, in Princess Anne, Maryland...details coming soon!

Plan to be in Louisiana in October for the Acadian - Cajun festival season!

http://lafayettetravel.com/play/festivalsevents/festival-acadiens

Let's not forget to go to Maine!

http://www.abbemuseum.org/calendar/july.html

 
 

Mackinac Island Fur-trader Native American Roots Twice Verified by Daughter's DNA
...by Marie Rundquist and Richard Wiles

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Charles Wachter, Jr.
Mackinac Island on Lake Huron is central to the histories of North America's fur-trading industry in the the 18th and 19th centuries and the Wachter, Fraser, Fisher, and Farlinger (also known as Farling and McFarland) families of northern Michigan.  On Mackinac Island, a 3.8 square mile spit of land located at the “tip of the mitten,” mid-way between Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, the North American fur-trading industry found its nexus, and a culture, comprised of Canadian fur-traders and their Native American wives, had its beginnings.

At the root of this family genealogy and cultural heritage is grandmother “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” whose storied, Scottish surname evokes discussion of John Fraser, a founding partner in Canada's McTavish, Fraser and Co. -- chief suppliers and fur brokers for the legendary North West Company... Click here to read more!